TR 2019 Schedule

October 17-19, 2019

Sheraton Universal Hotel

333 Universal Hollywood Dr.

Universal City, CA 91608

818-980-1212

Friday October 18, 2019

8:30am Keynote: Jo Muirhead | The Entrepreneurial Clinician: How we will change health care from the inside out

10:30am Break Out Sessions:
Mercedes Samudio, LCSW | We Need Your Voice: Strategies to Get Your Message Out Into the World
Shira Myrow, LMFT | The Exponential “Mental Load” of Therapists
Katie Read, LMFT | Website Masterclass: Using Your Clinical Skills to Create an Irresistible Site and Attract Your Ideal Clients
Debi Frankle, LMFT | Stop Referring Out! Treat Grief Like a Pro: The Essential Ingredients for a Grief Therapist in Private Practice

11:30am-1:00pm Optional Continuing Education Lunch:
Dr. Ben Caldwell, LMFT | What it Means to be a Good Therapist

1:00pm-3:00pm Thought Bubble Panel:
How Therapists Achieve Community and Social Change

3:30pm Break Out Sessions:
Dr. Talal H. Alsaleem PsyD, LMFT | Treating Couples in Crisis: Clinician Challenges in Infidelity Counseling
Anna Osborn, LMFT | Maintaining Motivation in the Eye of Defeat
Patricia Ravitz, LMFT | Ethics, Political Activism, and the Modern Therapist
Anita Avedian, LMFT | A Step by Step Guide to Serving Clients by Building a Training Curriculum

5:00pm Break Out Sessions:
Megan Costello, LMFT | Bringing the Best of Community Mental Health to Private Practice
Nikki Rubin, PsyD | Using Countertransference to Your Therapeutic Advantage
Ulash Thakore-Dunlap, LMFT | Mentoring Therapists to Help Our Profession Grow and Flourish
John Sovec, LMFT | LGBTQ Affirming Care: It’s More Than Just an Alphabet

Saturday October 19, 2019

7:00am Morning Talk: Cori Rosenthal, LMFT | Managing and Avoiding Empathy Fatigue

8:30am Break Out Sessions:
Dr. Celisa Flores, PsyD | The Neuroscience of Stress
Nicol Stolar-Peterson, LCSW | Cover Your Assets: Protecting your practice by minimizing risk
Angela Caldwell, LMFT | Get Over Yourself: Arrogance and Elitism in the Psychotherapy Field
Eliza Boquin, LMFT and Eboni Harris, LPC, LMFT | The Uncomfortable Truth About Race and Racism in Therapy

10:30am Keynote:
Tiffany McLain, LMFT | The Power of Taking: Why learning to receive leads to improved clinical outcomes and increased professional satisfaction

12:00pm-1:30pm Optional Continuing Education Lunch:
Ernesto Segismundo, LMFT | The Authentic, Engaging and Not The Typical Psychotherapist

1:30pm Break Out Sessions:
Dr. Maelisa Hall, PsyD | Ethics: Advocating for Clients in Insurance Audits
Marquita Johnson, LPC | The Impact of Technology on Modern Clients
Perry Rosenbloom | Using Social Media to Grow Your Private Practice
Dr. Teyhou Smyth, LMFT | Avoiding impairment, fighting professional stress, and finding balance

3:00pm Thought Bubble Panel:
Competencies for Specific Populations

 

Continuing Education Information

Sign up!

Our Full Schedule

Pre-Conference: October 15-16, 2019

Come early to the conference hotel for a business-building, burnout-busting experience with our keynote speaker, Jo Muirhead: Success Mindset Masterclass

If you sign up for both, you can get a very special offer!!

 

Thursday Evening, October 17, 2019

6:00 pm

VIP Reception with Speakers, Sponsors, and #ModernTherapists

 

Friday October 18, 2019

Our day starts early, so make sure to arrive the night before if you can. Registration starting at 7 am. We have a jam-packed day of Keynotes, Interactive Workshops, Demonstrations, and Our Innovative Thought Bubble Panel. Hosted Continuing Education lunch for VIPs and Concierge level tickets or a lunch on your own at the hotel or nearby Universal City Walk with General Admission. We will also have a Friday Evening Reception and Live Podcast.

Friday 7:00 AM – Registration and Breakfast

Friday 8:30 AM – Welcome and Our First Keynote!

Jo Muirhead | The Entrepreneurial Clinician: How we will change health care from the inside out (1.5 CEs)

This workshop is designed to help therapists and mental health professionals to identify, understand and apply our expertise in human behavior and change through the lens of entrepreneurial literacy. While most commonly applied in business contexts, entrepreneurial thinking and behavior is a baseline characteristic required for clinicians in all settings. Its application can reduce stigma surrounding mental health care, empower clients to ask for help, demonstrate the caring you have for your clients, and enable you to remain healthy, present, and resilient throughout your career. This workshop draws on neuroscience and behavioral theory to challenge unhelpful thinking, and use strengths and motivators to create a foundation for success. Concepts and applications included in this course can be applied to clients and clinicians alike.
Learning Objectives:
By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:
1. Identify at least three motivators that drive their current work.
2. Apply entrepreneurial thinking to their clinical practice to support the achievement of client goals.
3. Develop specific criteria for clinical success based on a client’s behavioral and motivational characteristics.

Friday 10:00 AM – Break!

Take a breath and some time to check out our exhibitors. We will have special demos and lots of fun!

Friday 10:30 AM – Break Out Sessions

Mercedes Samudio, LCSW | We Need Your Voice: Strategies to Get Your Message Out Into the World (1 CE)

While professional ethics codes call upon therapists to enact community and social change, we’re not taught as therapists what it truly means to create a message and share that big vision with the world. This session will explore the strategies to find your unique message, determine how you want to share that message, and take your big vision from your head to the clients and communities who need to hear your message in order to bring forth the courage to heal.
Learning Objectives:
By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:
1. Identify the client and community audiences who could benefit most from your knowledge, training, and experience
2. Develop a single, clear message that resonates with your unique voice and your ideal audience to instill hope and the opportunity for change
3. Refine and customize your message through clinical work and client feedback
4. Design a strategic plan to bring your message to your ideal audience

Shira Myrow, LMFT | The Exponential “Mental Load” of Therapists (1 CE)

The “mental load” is a feminist term initially coined to describe the silent psychological burden of women who take care of children and household duties, often in addition to holding down a job. It also refers to the devaluation and largely “invisible labor” of managing the minutiae of details related to domestic family life.
Modern day therapists carry an additional “mental load,” that can lead to compassion fatigue, burn-out, stress, illness, and a level of cognitive overload that can’t be solved by self care practices alone. Ostensibly, the requirement of a psychotherapist is to retain a vast amount of details, important events, names and narratives related to each client’s life in addition to offering psychological containment.
However, qualitatively life in the digital age is far more complex to negotiate for everyone. We are affected by the same amount of stress and technological addictions as the clients we treat. So when we pair the responsibility of our professional mental loads, including the challenges of being a small business owner–with our personal ones– trying to find balance becomes elusive at best. We may not even fully understand how our mental load affects us–emotionally and physiologically over the long term. Therapists are in no way immune to stress and cognitive overload. In fact we may have a harder time coming to terms with it, because our professional job is to manage it for others.
Shira Myrow will explore the cultural nature of the exponential “mental load”for therapists– and how to use mindfulness to create compassion, curiosity and space between our expectations and our limitations around our ability to manage our unique work and life loads.
Learning objectives:
1. Define “mental load” in the broader cultural context
2. Define “mental load” specific to therapists
3. Explore how stress in the digital age/ technology use affects our autonomic nervous system.
4. Explore how our field taxes our autonomic nervous system as well as our cognitive and compassionate thresholds.
5. Describe mindfulness/meditation (MBSR) as one way of observing our experience and regulating stress/ cognitive overload

Katie Read, LMFT | Website Masterclass: Using Your Clinical Skills to Create an Irresistible Site and Attract Your Ideal Clients

**PLEASE NOTE: NO CEs AVAILABLE FOR THIS TALK**
You know your Ideal Clients. You’ve got the clinical skills to speak right to them. You just need some guidance and shaping to rewrite your website in a way that motivates your Ideal Clients to call asap. Give yourself a huge burst of confidence and help your clients get help faster…and with you!
Learning Objectives:
1. How and why to have a niche
2. Basic website copywriting flow to encourage conversions/more people getting the help they need faster How to use MI on your site
3. How to use ACT principles on your site

Debi Frankle, LMFT | Stop Referring Out! Treat Grief Like a Pro: The Essential Ingredients for a Grief Therapist in Private Practice (1 CE)

Grief is one of the top 3 reasons people seek help from a mental health professional. Yet, it if often unrecognized and unaddressed fully by private practice practitioners. The Essential Ingredients you need to specialize in this area are vital to having a successful practice. Find out what: You need to address for yourself; Your clients desperately need from you; How your colleagues can help you and how you can help them; Your community needs; How to motivate yourself in this field of grief; How important it is to include Self Care.
Learning Objectives:
1. Identify at least 3 important factors to address and include in private practice that are loss and grief related to the client.
2. Identify at least 3 ways to re-educate clients and your community about the insidious effects of grief on their health.
3. Identify at least 3 resources to utilize in private practice to address grief.

 

Friday 11:30 AM to 1:00 PM – Optional Continuing Education Lunch (with VIP and Concierge Admission)

Dr. Ben Caldwell, LMFT | What it Means to be a Good Therapist (1CE)

In one study, *every single therapist surveyed* rated themselves as “above average” in their profession. It’s unlikely that the researchers just happened upon a skilled group. In a profession that prizes self-awareness, how can half of us be so mistaken? It may have something to do with there being so many meaningful ways to be and do good as a therapist. In this uplifting talk, Dr. Ben Caldwell reviews the clinical and moral aspects of defining yourself as a “good” therapist: How we reach that conclusion about ourselves in the first place, why it can be dangerous to believe your own hype, and how being good as a therapist also means continually working to be better. Participants are encouraged and empowered to reflect on what makes them good, assess the accuracy of their self-evaluation,
and find new ways to better achieve the aims they entered the field to achieve.
Learning Objectives:

  1. At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to articulate why they consider themselves to be good therapists.
  2. Identify at least two risks associated with defining yourself as a “good” therapist.
  3. Integrate at least one avenue for ongoing improvement as a therapist

General Admission: Lunch on your own at the hotel or nearby Universal City Walk

Friday 1:00 PM – Thought Bubble Panel: How Therapists Achieve Community and Social Change (2 CEs)

State of the art information, in bite sized pieces, followed by an in-depth discussion with our panel moderated by Katie Vernoy, LMFT.

In this panel presentation, speakers will review various means of using therapeutic principles and processes to achieve larger systemic changes. All major professional codes of ethics speak to the importance of considering the needs of one’s community and larger social systems. Presenters will integrate and apply therapeutic principles with tools of technology, thought leadership, management, and social justice. There will be also be a panel Q&A session.

  1. Marissa Lawton | The Thought Leader Therapist: it’s OK to have big ideas and even more OK to share them
  2. Howard Spector | How Successful People Meet Their Goals
  3. Frances Harvey | Manage Your Business or Your Business Manages You. You Choose
  4. Kristin Martinez, LMFT | The New PC: Person Centered Management Effects on Teaming and Productivity
  5. James Guay, LMFT | Being a #ModernTherapist Means Doing Social Justice Work
  6. Dr. Paul Puri | Evolving Therapy for the Future: Technology, Community, and Equity

Friday 3:00 PM – Break!

Take a breath and some time to check out our exhibitors. We will have special demos and lots of fun!

Friday 3:30 PM – Break Out Sessions

Dr. Talal H. Alsaleem PsyD, LMFT | Treating Couples in Crisis: Clinician Challenges in Infidelity Counseling (1 CE)

Working with couples in crisis can be overwhelming for new and seasoned clinicians, this is especially when it comes to working with clients struggling with infidelity who are often in extreme emotional distress and feeling lost and hopeless about the future of their relationship. The knowledge base you will gain from this workshop are based on extensive clinical work with couples dealing with infidelity and supported by data from a comprehensive review of the current body of research. Completing this workshop will expand your understanding of the clinical challenges associated with the journey of healing and give you the clinical tools you need to be better prepared for working with couples in crisis.
Learning Objectives:
1. Participants will be able to identify at least 3 necessary areas of assessment needed for couples in crisis.
2. Participants will be able to identify at least 2 components of a safe therapeutic environment for couples in crisis.
3. Participants will be able to list at least 3 personal challenges faced by therapists working with couples in crisis and how to overcome such challenges.

Anna Osborn, LMFT | Maintaining Motivation in the Eye of Defeat (1 CE)

It is commonly accepted that all forms of helpers, and therapists in particular, are at a great risk for burn out, compassion fatigue, imposter syndrome and the torture of comparisons. One of the primary personal and professional tools we have in our arsenal is our knowledge of motivation. This presentation addresses the nuts and bolts of motivation, including how some forms of motivation actually work against us. Ultimately, the workshop describes how to implement, for yourself and for clients, a habit loop that creates sustained motivation while also empowering individuals to identify and apply their own rituals of recovery. This presentation is centered around direct application and energizing content that will leave attendees inspired and ready to apply the tools of motivation in their own lives and professional practices.
Learning Objectives:
By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:
1. Identify at least three of their own personal motivators
2. Differentiate between motivation that restrains progress toward goals and motivation that creates progress toward goals.
3. Design and implement a habit loop that creates sustained motivation, even through short-term setbacks.

Patricia Ravitz, LMFT | Ethics, Political Activism, and the Modern Therapist (1 CE)

Professional codes of ethics demand that therapists and counselors work beyond our own practices to fight for larger community and social change. However, studies frequently show that we hesitate to engage in such efforts, even when our voices would be welcomed. Our voices, even on an individual level, can impact access to care and community well-being. This course will discuss why activism matters, and how to engage in political activism in ways that bring our values to the communities we serve.
Learning objectives:
By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:
1. Identify their ethical obligation for political involvement and advocacy
2. Connect their professional values with at least two social or community goals
3. List three effective methods of political advocacy for mental health professionals

Anita Avedian, LMFT | A Step by Step Guide to Serving Clients by Building a Training Curriculum (1 CE)

Are you ready to put together your own curriculum? If you work with a specific problem or population, you may find that some components of your work are largely consistent: You give some of the same speeches, and refer to some of the same resources. Psychoeducational training programs can expand your clinical impact by providing this standard content on a group or even homestudy basis, allowing you to focus precious clinical time on the unique needs of a specific case. This breakout session will cover the process of creating and developing a curriculum for your clientele: Determining its scope and goals, assessing important material to include, and deciding its ideal format, and launching. The use of assessments to measure the effectiveness of your program is also discussed.
Learning objectives:
By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:
1. Develop an outline for a curriculum to serve their specific clientele
2. Apply research to determine what content to incorporate into the program
3. Determine what program length is most appropriate for the served population
4. Select an assessment to use for program evaluation

Friday 4:30 PM – Break!

Take a breath and some time to check out our exhibitors. We will have special demos and lots of fun!

Friday 5:00 PM – Break Out Sessions

Megan Costello, LMFT | Bringing the Best of Community Mental Health to Private Practice (1 CE)

Modern therapists can and should be seeking innovative care delivery models. Community mental health provides a great template for meeting clients where they are, and serving a broad, diverse client base. This workshop will review ways that community mental health practices like in-home visits, collateral sessions and push-in services can be adapted to private practice settings, and the benefits of doing so.
Learning objectives
By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:
1. Identify at least three clinical benefits of in-home therapy
2. List at least four DSM diagnoses where home visits may be helpful
3. Describe at least three additional elements of community mental health care that can be successfully adapted to the private practice context.

Nikki Rubin, PsyD | Using Countertransference to Your Therapeutic Advantage (1 CE)

Some clients do strange, funny, or offensive things. It’s normal for therapists to be confused, amused, or offended by them. Rather than labeling all therapist reactions as “countertransference” and trying to hide them away, recognizing those reactions as useful data can drive therapy forward. In this workshop, we discuss how even negative reactions to clients can be used therapeutically to encourage more adaptive behavior and help clients understand the reactions they elicit elsewhere in their lives. We specifically review what to do with therapist experiences of discomfort and feeling unsafe. These feelings can mean many things, but they should not be ignored.
Learning Objectives:
By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:
1. Identify at least 3 bodily cues indicating countertransference reactions
2. Link countertransference reactions to the case formulation and treatment
3. Differentiate times when sharing countertransference feedback with the client is appropriate from times when it is not

Ulash Thakore-Dunlap, LMFT | Mentoring Therapists to Help Our Profession Grow and Flourish (1 CE)

Mentoring has been used to promote personal and professional development among students and early career workers for generations. Mentoring provides support that has been especially impactful for developing careers for members of underrepresented communities: people of color, women, first generation college students, and LGBTQ individuals. This workshop will explore a program providing Mastermind Groups for emerging women of color leaders in mental health care. The current Mastermind Group provides 3-4 emerging women of color leaders a supportive space to explore personal goals related to their leadership aspirations. Mastermind groups help to challenge each participant to create and implement goals, brainstorm ideas, and support each other with total honesty, respect and compassion. This workshop will share how to run such a group, lessons learned, and the ways in which the group supports early career women of color leaders. The overall goal of this workshop is to discuss how therapists can both seek and provide mentoring to grow personally and professionally.
By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:
1. Describe three ways in which mentoring helps early career mental health professionals achieve their clinical and professional goals.
2. Identify at least two strategies for promoting and utilizing mentoring.
3. Identify two similarities and two differences between mentoring and supervision.

John Sovec, LMFT | LGBTQ Affirming Care: It’s More Than Just an Alphabet

As a professional working with the LGBTQ community, even the most well meaning clinician can find themselves making mistakes in communication, treatment planning, and community involvement that make it challenging for an LGBTQ client to feel safe and understood. It is vital for clinicians to cultivated an awareness as to how biases and agendas develop and how the pervasiveness of these constructs can influence the therapeutic alliance. This workshop will explore a model of care that addresses the impact of sexual minority status on mental and physical health. We will explore the alienation of LGBTQ clients from their family of origin, understand coping mechanism that influence LGBTQ identity development, and how by creating an affirming and supportive environment, clients can regain and expand their sense of LGBTQ identity. Issues of sexuality, gender, intimacy, sexual needs, family dynamics and more will be explored in this highly interactive workshop that provides exploration, discussion, and tools to address these challenging issues.

Learning Objectives
1. Increase personal clinical awareness of the effects of social stigma on the development of self-esteem in LGBTQ clients.
2. Deconstruct the social constructs of homophobia as it applies to the real life experiences of LGBTQ clients.
3. Apply therapeutic concepts developed during the workshop to the clinical setting with respect to cultural and social constructs.
4. Analyze developmental models of sexuality and how they influence the challenges of the coming out process.

Friday 6:00 PM – Reception

Friday 6:30 PM – Live Podcast: Defining the Therapy Movement

Join Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy of The Modern Therapist’s Survival Guide for a live podcast recording! *No CEs provided*

We will be talking about the foundations of our therapy movement looking at what it means to be a #moderntherapist:

  1. Working to end bad working conditions and crappy wages as a rite of passage
  2. Embracing diversity to push back against therapy as patriarchal, white-washed, heterosexist, and inaccessible to marginalized communities
  3. Incorporating technology and modern advances to improve clinical outcomes
  4. Advocating for REAL change to decrease stigma, improve our profession, and support our communities
  5. Prioritizing clinicians as the agents of change in therapy – improving education and training
  6. Understanding that self-care is a requirement for clinicians to sustain this challenging career

 

Sign up for TR2019!

 

Saturday October 19, 2019

Once again we’re starting early at 7 am. We have a jam-packed day of Keynotes, Interactive Workshops, Demonstrations, and Our Innovate Thought Bubble Panel. Hosted Continuing Education lunch for VIPs and Concierge level tickets. Lunch on your own at Universal City Walk with General Admission.

Saturday 6:30 AM – Registration and Breakfast

Saturday 7:00 AM – Morning Talk

Cori Rosenthal, LMFT | Managing and Avoiding Empathy Fatigue (1 CE)

When we sit with people who are suffering, we experience that suffering in our own bodies as well. When we become overwhelmed by this, it is called compassion fatigue or burnout. Self-care is often prescribed for burnout; activities like exercise, massage, hot bath and support from friends. Self-care is valuable but it also is not necessarily accessible during the 10-minute break between clients. Self-compassion, however, is. Research shows that counselors and therapists with a high level of self-compassion experience a greater sense of well-being and a lower level of burnout. During this experiential workshop, participants will learn how the combination of mindfulness and self-compassion can function as powerful support tools, personally and professionally. Together we will explore the science supporting Mindful Self-Compassion, while providing participants with simple self-compassion practice to integrate in their own lives and share with clients.
Learning Objectives:
1. Describe the three components of self-compassion.
2. List at least three physiological impacts of self-compassion.
3. Describe the importance of self-compassion in the prevention of compassion fatigue.
4. Conduct a basic informal self-compassion practice.

Saturday 8:00 AM – Break!

Take a breath and some time to check out our exhibitors. We will have special demos and lots of fun!

Saturday 8:30 AM – Break Out Sessions

Dr. Celisa Flores, PsyD | The Neuroscience of Stress (1.5 CEs)

This presentation will review the history, relevance, and impacts of mind-body approaches in self-care for mental health professionals. The neurological impacts of stress are becoming more clearly known. As healers, we are often inundated with new approaches and interventions to pass along to our clients to address these impacts. With our focus on clients, it can be difficult to decide what might be a good fit for ourselves. We will review mind-body practices, and engage in experiential work to facilitate a deeper understanding of the possibilities for applying mind-body practices to our own self-care practices, ensuring that our own stress does not negatively impact client care.
Learning objectives
1. Identify at least three neurological impacts of stress.
2. Identify three personal risks of stress for professional performance.
3. Describe appropriate use of meditation, yoga, and breath-work for their stress management.

Nicol Stolar-Peterson, LCSW | Cover Your Assets: Protecting your practice by minimizing risk (1.5 CEs)

This workshop will cover setting clear boundaries via website language, informed consent, well-crafted policies, and clarifying one’s ideal client. Participants will learn to implement safeguards for clinical practice, including minimizing areas of potential legal and ethical risk. This workshop will shift how therapists get approached by attorneys, and how we respond to them. Implementing CYA (Cover Your Assets) is a great way to protect the valuable work that we do as therapists.
Learning objectives:
At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:
1. Construct and implement effective boundaries with clients, evidenced by websites, informed consent language, and practice policies.
2. Construct safeguards to minimize at least two legal risk areas in the participant’s current practice.
3. Provide competent responses when dealing with attorneys and court systems on issues related to client care.

Angela Caldwell, LMFT | Get Over Yourself: Arrogance and Elitism in the Psychotherapy Field (1.5 CEs)

Despite our intentions to help, therapists make assumptions about their clients and their work that ultimately drive people away from psychotherapy. There is a wealth of research demonstrating that a great many people with mental and emotional problems choose not to go to therapy, or discontinue soon after they start. In many cases, we know the reasons. This seminar will engage participants in a series of self-reflective exercises to examine common practices in psychotherapy that transmit a message of arrogance and elitism to the public. It will challenge contradictions prevalent in the field that confuse and anger the people it aims to serve, and invite participants to make changes not just in their practice, but also in their fundamental conceptualization of the work we claim to do.
Learning Objectives:
By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:
1. List at least three assumptions that therapists make about their work that distance them from the public
2. Identify at least five “original rules” of psychotherapy that may actually be turning the public off
3. Make at least two changes to areas in their own practices where they use therapy jargon, mislead the public as to their own importance, or otherwise engage in activities of arrogance
4. Describe at least two studies examining the reasons why individuals with mental health needs choose not to attend therapy or discontinue after one session

Eliza Boquin, LMFT and Eboni Harris, LPC, LMFT | The Uncomfortable Truth About Race and Racism in Therapy (1.5 CEs)

Well intentioned phrases like “You are so strong and resilient” can be the last thing a client of color wants to hear when they enter the therapy room. In this presentation, Eboni and Eliza of Melanin & Mental Health will engage the audience in the uncomfortable conversation about race and racism in therapy. They will address the problematic relationship between Black and Latinx communities and mental health. This will include the history of race and mental health, systemic racism and how it has shown up in healthcare, and what goes wrong in the therapy room. They will also give tools therapists can use to check for their own blind spots, and provide guidance on how therapists may need to show up differently for Black and Latinx communities.
Learning objectives:
By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:
1. Identify at least 3 key elements of the history of mental health care in Black and Latinx communities
2. Identify at least 2 ways in which systemic racism has deterred minority communities to seek mental health services
3. Engage in at least 3 activities to highlight the impact of micro and macro aggressions
4. Apply at least 3 tools to creating a safer environment in the therapy room for Black & Latinx clients

Saturday 10:00 AM – Break!

Take a breath and some time to check out our exhibitors. We will have special demos and lots of fun!

Saturday 10:30 AM – Keynote

Tiffany McLain, LMFT | The Power of Taking: Why learning to receive leads to improved clinical outcomes and increased professional satisfaction (1.5 CEs)

While mental health practitioners have made great strides in discussing death, sex, religion and politics, when it comes to money, we remain paralyzed. This course will utilize existing research about how therapists relate to money, and its connection to their family of origin, the wider professional culture and society at large. This research helps shed light on why so many therapists enter private practice with a “martyrdom mentality” that is not only problematic for the therapist, but also for relationships with clients. The course provides a 4-part framework that will address the barriers many therapists have to addressing financial issues head on. This presentation will invite the audience to examine their countertransference toward receiving, both in general and specifically as it relates to money, while working with the clients they are passionate about serving.
Learning objectives:
1. Identify three common countertransference experiences that arise when addressing fees in the clinical situation.
2. Implement clinically, ethically, and financially sound practice policies related to money, gifts, and other forms of receiving from clients.
3. Identify at least three ways in which social, cultural, and professional factors impact the therapist’s ability to effectively address clinical issues – particularly for women and minorities.

Saturday 12:00 PM to 1:30 PM – Optional Continuing Education Lunch (with VIP and Concierge Admission)

Ernesto Segismundo, LMFT | The Authentic, Engaging and Not-The-Typical Psychotherapist (1 CE)

Our community and those we serve expect us to be authentic, courageous and creative. Many newer psychotherapists shy away from being their authentic selves (creative, innovative, courageous, and out of the box thinkers), because they have been shamed, told or coerced to stay within the box of a more traditional psychotherapist. This workshop is an exploration of the persona of the Not Your Typical Psychotherapist—those who dare to challenge conventional wisdom and status quo; those who are entrepreneurial, creative and innovative; those who are human first. This course will review the benefits of therapist authenticity for both the therapist and clients.

Learning objectives:

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify 4 areas of authenticity.
  2. Apply the Johari Window concept to authenticity of the whole person therapist.
  3. Identify at least 3 benefits of therapist authenticity in the clinical relationship.

General Admission: Lunch on your own at the hotel or nearby Universal City Walk

Saturday 1:30 PM – Break Out Sessions

Dr. Maelisa Hall, PsyD | Ethics: Advocating for Clients in Insurance Audits (1 CE)

As access to insurance increases, the hope is that access to counseling services will also increase. However, counselors receive little to no training in how this impacts their care for clients, mainly regarding documentation and approval of services. Ethics codes demand that counselors and therapists advocate on behalf of their clients with insurers and other third-party payors. This workshop reviews the concepts and processes that mental health providers need to be familiar with to conduct that advocacy successfully during the insurance audit process. Insurance values the concept of medical necessity and it is crucial for both in and out of network counselors to understand this concept. Documentation is the means by which counselors justify medical necessity. Come learn from someone who is experienced reviewing client charts as an objective auditor and gain insight regarding what is commonly missed or misunderstood by counselors in their documentation. In this interactive workshop, counselors will learn how to correct these mistakes and leave with the confidence they need to move forward and provide quality client care with less stress.
Learning objectives
By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:
1. Define medical necessity and apply the concept to a specific client population.
2. Identify how documentation in accordance with legal, ethical, and professional standards can assist or deter clients from receiving mental health services reimbursed by insurance.
3. Describe the process for reviewing a progress note based on insurance standards.
4. Advocate on behalf of clients during an insurance audit, in accordance with professional ethical standards.

Marquita Johnson, LPC | The Impact of Technology on Modern Clients (1 CE)

Therapy was once limited to “talk therapy” only; with little emphasis being placed on outside resources or support. We can no longer deny the impact that technology has on everyone. Millennials have witnessed first hand the roller coaster ride that comes along with managing technology. Often therapists, social workers, and others in the helping field shy away from technology, however it is here to stay. In my presentation, I will explore the mindset of millennials and how they are impacted in therapy with an emphasis on integrating technology. We will address various social media platforms and how they can be useful to utilize in counseling and outside of counseling.
Learning objectives:
1. Participants will be able to identify two ways the use of technology impact therapy with millennials.
2. Participants will be able to identify at least two evidenced based approaches that are effective with millennials in therapy.
3. Participants will be able to summarize two ways how clients respond to the use of technology by therapists, social workers, and others in the helping profession.

Perry Rosenbloom | Using Social Media to Grow Your Private Practice

**PLEASE NOTE: NO CEs AVAILABLE FOR THIS TALK**
Should you be on Facebook? How about Tweeting? And what about Instagram? Well, it depends. Learn how to decide which social media platforms are best for your business, and how to craft a strategy to leverage these platforms to be both a resource for your community and to grow your private practice.

Dr. Teyhou Smyth, LMFT | Avoiding Impairment, Fighting Professional Stress, and Finding Balance ( 1 CE)

The work of mental health professionals is unique and noble in nature. Work/life balance and stress management are often overlooked for the sake of helping our clients. This can leave us depleted and without resources to continue performing our work at optimum levels. Burnout and its associated professional impairment can creep up on us not because we are incompetent, but because clinical work is mentally demanding. Our professional self-evaluation, stress management, and self care strategies need to be both effective and creative in order to maintain the best clinical tool we have — ourselves.
Learning objectives:
By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:
1. Distinguish professional impairment from typical professional stress
2. Apply the self care wheel to their own practices to move away from potential impairment and toward balance
3. Describe at least three advanced stress management and self care strategies appropriate for mental health professionals to avoid impairment

Saturday 2:30 PM – Break!

Take a breath and some time to check out our exhibitors. We will have special demos and lots of fun!

Saturday 3:00 PM – Thought Bubble Panel: Competencies with Specific Populations (2 CEs)

State of the art information, in bite sized pieces, followed by an in-depth discussion with our panel, Moderated by Curt Widhalm, LMFT.

In this panel presentation, speakers will discuss therapeutic best practices for a number of specific elements of diversity among both clients and therapists. Attention will be given to techniques and practices that move beyond awareness and into affirming and supporting actions therapists can take, both to work with the specific populations described and to openly attend to areas of difference. There will also be a panel Q&A session.

  1. Jessica Tang, LMFT | Being an Ethnic Minority Therapist: Facing Adversity and Maintaining Resilience
  2. Zeahlot Lopez, LMFT, LPCC | Providing Therapy to Latinx Clients
  3. Robyn Goldberg, RDN, CEDRD | Understanding Health At Every Size (HAES)
  4. Jill Johnson-Young, LMFT | Dementia: Getting it Right
  5. Sage Mendez-McLeish, MA | I’m Affirming, Now What?! Best Practices in Serving Trans and Gender Divergent Youth and Families
  6. Katie Keates May, NCC, LPC | The Power of Group Therapy for Teens

Saturday 5:00 PM – Take home so much inspiration and excitement about our field!!

Continuing Education Information

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(Please note: This agenda is subject to change)

 

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For more information about the sponsorship levels or to sponsor: visit www.therapyreimagined.com, email events@therapyreimagined.com, or call Katie Vernoy at 424-241-3205.